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Put Your Heart & Mind in Your Mouth – Final

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As September draws to a close, here is our Final post about Oral Health. So last week we discussed the link between Oral Health and Cardiovascular Disease. This week’s discussion is about another important disease link.

Study claims: The Cause of Alzheimer’s could be Coming From Inside Your Mouth
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In recent years, a growing number of scientific studies have backed an alarming hypothesis: Alzheimer’s disease isn’t just a disease, it’s an infection.
While the exact mechanisms of this infection are something researchers are still trying to isolate, a litany of papers argue the deadly spread of Alzheimer’s goes way beyond what we used to think.
Now, scientists are saying they’ve got one of the most definitive leads yet for a bacterial culprit behind Alzheimer’s, and it comes from a somewhat unexpected quarter: gum disease.
In a new paper led by senior author Jan Potempa, a microbiologist from the University of Louisville, researchers report the discovery of Porphyromonas gingivalis – the pathogen behind chronic periodontitis (aka gum disease) – in the brains of deceased Alzheimer’s patients.
It’s not the first time the two factors have been linked.

Impact On Pregnant Women & New Borns
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Due to the increase in hormone levels, particularly estrogen and progesterone, pregnant women are at greater risk to develop inflamed gums, which if left untreated can lead to periodontal disease. A five-year study conducted at the University of North Carolina found that pregnant women with periodontal disease are seven times more likely to deliver a premature, low-birth-weight baby.

The connection between poor oral health and overall health may not be limited to cardiovascular disease. Studies have linked periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, a 2016 study found a link between the same bacterium and risk of pancreatic cancer. However, we’ll need additional research to figure out the importance of these observations.

Whether the link is direct, indirect or coincidence, a healthy mouth, and a regimen to keep it that way (including not smoking, and getting regular dental care) can help you keep your teeth. That’s reason enough to do what you can to make oral health a priority. Perhaps it will turn out to have other benefits though much of that remains speculative.
Stand by for more studies on the link between oral health and overall health. Until then, keep brushing, flossing and seeing your dentist.

To keep your teeth, gums and body healthy, we recommend the following:
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  • Provide your dentist with a complete health history, including any illnesses and medication use.
  • Brush your teeth twice a day with a good organic based toothpaste.
  • Floss daily to help remove plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that gets stuck between your teeth and under your gums.
  • Visit your dentist for regular checkups and your oral hygienist for professional cleaning to help prevent any problems and detect possible problems in their early stages. The mouth is often the location used to diagnose a variety of diseases.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet, which will help you maintain a healthier immune system, help prevent heart disease and slow diabetes disease progression.

A Clean/healthy Mouth will lead to a Clean/healthy Body

BALANCED HEALING can assist by screening the body to assess overall health status and recommend a suitable lifestyle programme to reduce inflammation & infection. We work in collaboration with a holistic oral hygienist for further diagnosis and treatment.

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